Havas Discovery Blog
24Jun/13

Our Core Principles of CRM: #6 – #10

As referenced in the CRM blog series introductory post, Winning Customer Loyalty From the Passenger Seat, Havas Discovery has developed 10 core principles of loyalty marketing.

Check out previous posts to read more on the core CRM principles:

1.      The loyalty program is not the goal, it is the means to an end

2.      Customer loyalty runs deeper than the transaction

3.      Reward the behavior you seek

4.      Relevance2 = Generosity/2

5.      The customer loyalty contract

What’s next? Principles #6 through 10 are below.

6.      Be virtually everywhere

The line between our physical and virtual worlds is fading. We invest more personal time in online activities. There are new realities and opportunities to connect and play in the online environment. And brands need to harness this, and turn up wehre the customer is, in order to remain relevant, and earn that customer loyalty. Shopper marketing is not just about being front and center in-store anymore, it's about remaining top of mind whenever, and wherever the audience is in the shopping mindset.

7.      Understand the metrics of membership

Consumers join loyalty and CRM programs for a reason. They actively op in. Understanding what the motivations are for opting-in are crucial in terms of driving ongoing brand engagement and satisfaction. Of course, this behavior is often driven by discounts and offers, but a lot of time it's about value-added content, being part of a community of like-minded people, or a sense of worthiness.

8.      De-average your loyalty marketing

With the big data available to us, and the communication potential across channels, media and platforms, our marketing efforts should never be just average!

9.      Make it easy

As our customers adopt new technologies, transact and connect using multiple devices, interact and engage with each other in social outlets—marketers must work harder to provide the tools and CRM platforms for them to engage, interact, transact and connect with our brands. Consumers will become more engaged, and more loyal, if we make it easy for them to interact and transact on their terms, not ours.

10.     Keep it fresh

The best loyalty and CRM programs constantly innovate—introducing new initiatives all the time:

  • New ways to engage and interact through devices, apps, and media
  • New promotional hooks

This takes time, investment and effort—but it keeps customers engaged, and gives them a reason to interact with your brand. . . driving emotional and transactional loyalty.

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11Jun/13

Our Core Principles of CRM: #3 – 5

As referenced in the CRM blog series introductory post, Winning Customer Loyalty From the Passenger Seat, Havas Discovery has developed 10 core principles of loyalty marketing.

Check out previous posts to read more on the core CRM principles:

1.      The loyalty program is not the goal, it is the means to an end

2.      Customer loyalty runs deeper than the transaction

What’s next? Principles #3 through 5 are below. Please check back soon as we continue to round out our top 10 here on the Discovery Blog.

3.      Reward the behavior you seek

This one’s simple, but often forgotten!

Clearly define what you want your customers to do and reward them when they do it.  However, it is important to reward future customer loyalty not past loyalty—otherwise we are not generating behavioral change and value to the business. And rewards don’t necessarily mean discounts and offers—content and information can be just as compelling and motivating for a lot of customers.

Consumers thrive on being the first to know . . . and the first to share!

4.      Relevance2 = Generosity/2

As we think about rewarding behavior, we need to consider how these rewards take shape. The more relevant we can be in our content, offers and rewards, the less generous we need to make them.

Our customers don’t expect us to give everything away for free (although they would like it), but they do expect us to know and understand them and make all of our communications relevant. Sometimes, content is king—we must consider how we provide a CRM platform to share ideas and inspiration and ultimately fuel the conversations consumers are having between themselves and about our brands.

5.      The customer loyalty contract

This is the engine behind all great customer loyalty and CRM programs:

  • It starts with identifying the right customers . . . advocates
  • We then reward their spend, consolidation of spend and engagement with our brand
  • From this, we can build dynamic customer data and knowledge about how they interact and engage with our brand—transactional engagement (purchase behavior) and emotional engagement (interactions with the brand in communications, across devices and in social media)
  • This allows us to identify individual customer groups, and allows us to segment our audience for greater efficiencies and relevance
  • And by grouping our customers in such a way, we can identify needs and opportunities which allow us to deliver more personal and relevant products and services to these customers, and others
  • And this, in turn, allows us to identify more of the right customers

And so the cycle begins—a virtuous cycle. If we get it wrong at any point, we find ourselves with a vicious cycle.

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30May/13

Our Core Principles of CRM: #1 and #2

As referenced in the CRM blog series introductory post, Winning Customer Loyalty From the Passenger Seat, Havas Discovery has developed 10 core principles of loyalty marketing.

Below are the first two! Please check back soon as we continue to round out our top 10 here on the Havas Discovery Blog.

1.      The loyalty program is not the goal, it is the means to an end

Ask not what you can do for your loyalty program, but what your loyalty program can do for you!

One of the first mistakes marketers make is not asking the right questions at the outset when embarking on customer loyalty initiatives. Our questions should not be about having a loyalty program so that customers can earn points and get rewards, how to structure the program, and how much to give away. It’s about what that program can do for your business and for your customers, and how it will solve problems or leverage opportunities that are currently present.

  • Who are our most valuable customers that we want to serve now, and in the future?
  • What problems do we need to fix to make our customers more loyal?
  • How can we persuade good customers to become even better ones?

These are valid questions that have stood the test of time. We should always be asking these. But as we enter the conversation economy, we need to ask more pressing questions around how our best customers consume media and content:

  • How does new media and the evolving relationship dynamic between brands and consumers change how we interact with our customers?
  • How do our customers want to engage with us?
  • What content are they looking for, and how can we deliver it in ever more innovative and relevant ways—on their terms?
  • And where are they consuming this content?

2.      Customer loyalty runs deeper than the transaction

All too often we measure loyalty by how much a customer purchases from us—how often they shop and how much they spend.  But this is a one-dimensional and functional perspective and measurement of customer loyalty and engagement. We are ignoring emotional customer loyalty. Sitting in the passenger seat, we need to observe our customer behaviors and understand what truly makes them loyal over and above purchasing our products.

As content is more easily consumed across platforms and devices, brand loyalty means something different to consumers today. Consumers want more than a transactional relationship with brands. Consumers expect to be in control of how content is delivered, disseminated, consumed and shared. Only then do they become emotionally engaged and loyal.

                                                                                           

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23May/13

Winning Customer Loyalty From The Passenger Seat

CRM Photo By ReferenceForBusiness.comIn today’s cluttered marketing environment, it is becoming increasingly difficult to win customer loyalty. Consumers are becoming promiscuous - hunting for deals on deal sites, and fighting each other for bargains during record-breaking Black Friday sales; low confidence in the weak economy means consumers have to continue to be financially responsible; consumers expect to feel the VIP treatment as standard; and as consumers spend more time in the digital world, marketers have to find new ways to connect, engage and remain relevant.

The marketing environment has changed. Customers have changed. The way customers consume content, engage with brands, how they shop and how they interact with one another - has all changed. What hasn’t changed is the way many brands approach CRM (customer relationship management).

There is a changing dynamic in the ownership of the relationship between brands and their customers. As marketers, we are no longer in control of this relationship.

As marketers, we need to take an interactive approach to CRM and how we build customer loyalty now and in the future. We need to foster interactions, connections, engagements and experiences between customers and brands. We interact with customers in the places they engage with each other, and in places they feel comfortable engaging with us.

Consumers have more power than ever before and emerging technologies are changing the way people shop and behave - your CRM and loyalty marketing programs needs to evolve. Our customers now have the ability to build up brands, and to also bring them to their knees. So choose now - do you want brand advocacy, or anarchy?

To build a better relationship with your customers, you must first engage them, and then keep them engaged. Only then will those consumers decide whether to change the dynamics of their relationship with you.

We, as marketers, are simply bystanders. We are in the passenger seat. And it’s from here that we must drive engagement, interactions and experiences, and ultimately earn customer loyalty.

Havas Discovery has developed ten core principles of loyalty marketing that are relevant to today’s marketing environment. Stay tuned as our agency unveils the ten principles of CRM right here on the HAVAS Discovery blog over the next few weeks!

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15May/13

DSC Lingo: What Does SSH, SEO, Parallax, and Landing Page Mean?

Many times in the advertising industry, acronyms and terms are thrown around like school lunches on the last day before summer break. It can be hard to decipher their meaning, let alone intent, when not fully immersed in this vocabulary. Here is the next set of terms to this handy acronym series.

SSH

Miami Edu 1950's Classroom What it stands for: Secure Shell
What it means: Secure Shell is a network protocol that allows for two networked computers to communicate with one another in a secure manner (usually over an insecure network) using advanced authentication.

SEO

What it stands for: Search Engine Optimization
What it means: 
Search Engine Optimization is the process of affecting (increasing) the ranking and visibility of a website or web page in a search engine's search results.

Parallax Scrolling

What it means: Parallax Scrolling refers to a technique where foreground images/content scroll at a different speed/rate than background images/content. This effect gives the user a different sense of motion and depth.

Landing Page

What it means: Landing Page is similar to a microsite, however it only consists of a single page. Landing pages are commonly used as part of online marketing campaigns. They act as destinations where users would land by clicking on an advertisement or search result.

Be sure to read all of the advertising acronyms and terms from the Havas DSC Lingo series!

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19Apr/13

DSC Lingo: What does Drop Down, SSL, QA, PKO, and Markup mean?

Many times in the advertising industry, acronyms and terms are thrown around like school lunches on the last day before summer break. It can be hard to decipher their meaning, let alone intent, when not fully immersed in this vocabulary. Here is the next set of terms to this handy acronym series.

Drop Down

Miami Edu 1950's Classroom What it means: A Drop Down Menu (or Drop Down) is a menu system, commonly used in website navigation, where a menu of options will drop down from a parent element. The drop down is initially hidden and, upon some interaction (such as a hover event), the menu will appear (if animated, from the top to the bottom).

SSL

What it stands for: Secure Sockets Layer
What it means: 
Secure Sockets Layer is a protocol that provides secure data exchange when communicating over the Internet. eCommerce sites typically have some sort of security in place to safeguard the transmission of credit card numbers and other personal information. Tip: Look for https:// instead of http://

QA

What it stands for: Quality Assurance
What it means: Quality Assurance is the process by which work is checked and double-checked for consistency, accuracy and errors, satisfying all requirements of the project based on set standards.

PKO

What it stands for: Project Kick Off or Production Kick Off
What it means: 
A Project Kick Off (sometimes referred to as Production Kick Off) is typically a meeting or notification that a project has started and that certain stages of the project life cycle can begin.

Markup

What it means: Markup refers to a system of writing a document in which the content is distinguishable from annotations. Think of "markup" as the code used to write a web page or other applications. As an example, HTML uses "tags" as part of its markup. These include <p>, <a> and <div> to name a few.

Be sure to read all of the advertising acronyms and terms from the Havas DSC Lingo series!

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17Apr/13

The Mobile Media Times Have a-Changed

Imagine you’re waiting for the bus, and the side of the shelter reads “In a hurry?” followed by a URL.  Intrigued, you interact with the ad using your smartphone.  Within a moment, a dog sled is there to pick you up!  Out-of-Home advertising is no longer simple, static billboards and boring bus wraps showing merely a phone number–it is transitioning to an even more digitally-capable medium.  And it isn’t the only outlet developing with the times.  There are banner ads on your tablet that you can simply click to “Like” a brand’s Facebook page or pay a visit to their website.  Entire cities are jumping on the digital bandwagon, too.  NYC Mayor Bloomberg recently announced eight initiatives aiming to strengthen and grow media and technology in the city.

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12Apr/13

Havas On Acronyms: What the QResponsiveEPS is he talking about?

Many times in the advertising industry, acronyms and terms are thrown around like school lunches on the last day before summer break. It can be hard to decipher their meaning, let alone intent, when not fully immersed in this vocabulary. Here is the next set of terms to this handy acronym series.

QR Code

Miami Edu 1950's ClassroomWhat it stands for: Quick Response Code
What it means: Quick Response Codes are nothing more than advanced barcodes. Their popularity in recent years is due to their ability to hold more data than conventional barcodes and their ability to be read quickly by scanners. A QR Code consists of black squares arranged in a square grid on a white background. Most modern phones have the ability to scan these codes quickly.

IDE

What it stands for: Integrated Development Environment
What it means: 
An Integrated Development Environment is a tool that developers will use when coding a piece of software. There are typically useful tools built into the IDE such as a compiler, editor and debugger. Some examples include Visual Studio, Eclipse and Dreamweaver (technically).

Responsive

What it means: A Responsive web page or application will automatically scale based on the viewable area of the user's browser or device, providing an optimized user experience. In some cases, content and elements may be hidden, added or positioned differently. Modern websites are utilizing responsive layouts, providing optimized experiences for desktop, tablet and mobile browsers.

EPS

What it stands for: Encapsulated PostScript
What it means: 
An Encapsulated PostScript is a file format used regularly in the design world (used with Abode Illustrator, for instance). Illustrations and vector graphics are commonly saved as this type of file.

FTP

What it stands for: File Transfer Protocol
What it means: File Transfer Protocol is a protocol used to transfer files from one source to another over the Internet. A user typically installs an FTP client (piece of software) and then connects remotely to a server and then uploads/downloads files.

Be sure to read all of the advertising acronyms and terms from the Havas On Acronyms series!

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22Mar/13

Havas On Acronyms: What the CSSMicrositeJS is he talking about?

Many times in the advertising industry, acronyms and terms are thrown around like school lunches on the last day before summer break. It can be hard to decipher their meaning, let alone intent, when not fully immersed in this vocabulary. Here is the next set of terms to this handy acronym series.

CSS 

Miami Edu 1950's Classroom What it stands for: Cascading Style Sheets
What it means: Cascading Style Sheets (commonly referred to as "Style Sheets" or "CSS") refers to a coding language used in the presentation of a document. CSS is usually used to alter the color, size, font and layout of elements found on a web page.

Microsite

What it means: A small group of web pages which are segregated from a main website's content is referred to as a Microsite. These types of mini websites are often used as discrete destinations for marketing campaigns.

JS

What it stands for: JavaScript
What it means: JavaScript is a programming language used on web pages and applications, allowing the client (user) to interact with the browser and web page content. JavaScript provides a way for users to become more engaged and for automated processes (think animations) to run, providing a more interactive user experience.

Be sure to read all of the advertising acronyms and terms from the Havas On Acronyms series!

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15Mar/13

Havas On Acronyms: What the APISpriteCTA is he talking about?

Many times in the advertising industry, acronyms and terms are thrown around like school lunches on the last day before summer break. It can be hard to decipher their meaning, let alone intent, when not fully immersed in this vocabulary. Here is the next set of terms to this handy acronym series.

API Miami Edu 1950's Classroom

What it stands for: Application Programming Interface
What it means: An Application Programming Interface is a protocol used to connect software components from one source to another. APIs may include certain data structures, classes and variables that can be accessed when building web applications and integrating the data from another website/application into your own. An example would be embedding a Google Map on your web page and customizing the pins and data on that map.

SPRITE

What it means: A sprite is an image that contains smaller images. Usually, small interface icons and images are combined into one image so that the server doesn't have to load each individual image separately. This increases speed and provides a more seamless experience to the end user. Check out this sprite used on Amazon.com as an example.

CTA

What it stands for: Call To Action
What it means: A Call To Action is commonly a graphic or text which is used to induce the user to perform some sort of action (such as clicking a button) and continue down a conversion process.

Be sure to read all of the advertising acronyms and terms from the Havas On Acronyms series!

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